Model portefeuille
Rendement portefeulle
+12.035 %

Rendement AEX
+33.325 %

Startdatum
01-01-2009

Startwaarde portefeuille € 74082.37

Startwaarde AEX
€ 245.94


Laatste update:
29-01-2010

Gut microbiota’s activation of MAIT lymphocytes could hold key to Type 1 diabetes prevention

Alleen voor leden beschikbaar, wordt daarom gratis lid!

Algemeen advies 10/10/2017 10:50
10 Oct 2017 --- The onset of Type 1 diabetes is preceded by modification of MAIT lymphocytes, which are activated by intestinal flora, according to scientists from the Cochin Institute (CNRS/INSERM/Paris Descartes University) and their colleagues from AP-HP Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital in Paris. The MAIT lymphocyte cells – associated with mucosae and able to recognize elements of the microbiota – could, therefore, serve as new biomarkers for early detection and prevention of the illness. The researchers' findings are published in Nature Immunology.

Destructive process
Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that develops when the immune system attacks beta cells in the pancreas. This destructive process is often attributed to autoreactive T lymphocytes. The innate immune system, the body's first line of defense, also plays an important role in this disease, the CNRS press release points out.

MAIT cells associated with the mucosae are an integral part of this front-line immunity. They are activated by bacteria – especially those of the intestinal flora, or gut microbiota. The research team wondered what role MAIT cells played in the T1D-related disturbance of this flora and of gut mucosal homeostasis.

Investigations, led by Agnès Lehuen, relied on T1D animal models studied by her team at the Cohin Institute as well as blood samples from patients under the care of Dr. Jacques Beltrand from the Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital. Findings for both the samples and the animal models showed that MAIT cells are altered before T1D develops.

When T1D is diagnosed in children, the number of MAIT cells in their blood is lower than in nondiabetic children. Migration of MAIT cells to inflamed pancreatic tissue in T1D patients could explain the discrepancy. This is noted by the CNRS press release to be a very reasonable assumption since the pancreatic population of MAIT cells swells in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. NOD mice develop a form of diabetes very similar to the human disease.

Furthermore, experiments performed by the researchers on human cells in vitro and on NOD mice suggest MAIT cells are directly linked to the destruction of pancreatic beta cells.

In addition to changes in their concentration and location within the body, it appears that a functional defect in MAIT cells is linked to the modifications of the gut mucosa seen in T1D patients. Indeed, a normal function of MAIT cells is to maintain the homeostasis of this mucosa.

This capacity is compromised in T1D, making the gut mucosa permeable to bacteria, which, in turn, favors an autoimmune response. Ongoing research seeks to better understand the links between MAIT cells and the gut microbiota.

New strategies for prevention
The team's discovery could lead to the development of new strategies for T1D treatment. Most importantly, it is now known that MAIT cells are early biomarkers for this form of diabetes because they undergo change sbefore the disease develops. Their use as such should improve T1D prevention.

INSERM Transfert has filed a patent in connection with its findings, on behalf of INSERM, the CNRS and Paris Descartes University.





Beperkte weergave !
Leden hebben toegang tot meer informatie! Omdat u nog geen lid bent of niet staat ingelogd, ziet u nu een beperktere pagina. Wordt daarom GRATIS Lid of login met uw wachtwoord


Copyrights © 2000 by XEA.nl all rights reserved
Niets mag zonder toestemming van de redactie worden gekopieerd, linken naar deze pagina is wel toegestaan.


Copyrights © DEBELEGGERSADVISEUR.NL