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Skin Health: Microbiota Plays Key Role in Acne Development

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Overig advies 09/04/2017 09:55
07 Apr 2017 --- Researchers have found that the overall balance of the bacteria on a person’s skin, rather than the presence or absence of a particular bacterial strain, appears to be an important factor for acne development and skin health. The research team used over-the-counter pore cleansing strips to obtain skin follicle samples and were able to detect the subtle differences in skin bacteria composition from those with, and without, acne.

The study provides new insights into the microbial mechanisms behind acne development and suggests that targeted treatments to modulate the skin microbiota and maintain a healthy bacterial balance may be preferable over antibiotic usage, which can unselectively kill both harmful and beneficial skin bacteria. These treatments could include probiotic supplementation or phage therapy that selectively targets specific bacterial strains.

Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition that affects 80%–85% of people at some point in their lives. While acne is a disease of hair follicles on the skin, the exact causes of the condition are unclear. The bacterium Propionibacterium acnes has long been associated with acne, but with P. acnes being the most prevalent and abundant species in the follicle in both healthy and acned individuals, its role in acne has not been well understood.

Researchers, led by Dr Huiying Li, an associate professor of molecular and medical pharmacology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, used over-the-counter pore cleansing strips to obtain skin follicle samples from 72 individuals: 38 with acne and 34 who didn’t have the disease. The team then used a technique called DNA shotgun sequencing analysis to identify and compare the make-up of the skin microbiome of the two groups, and further validated the findings in an additional 10 individuals.

The researchers were able to detect differences in skin bacteria composition, pinpointing fine genetic differences between the P. acnes strains of the two clinical groups. In the healthy group, the bacterial community was enriched with genes related to bacterial metabolism, which are thought to be important in preventing harmful bacteria from colonizing the skin.

In contrast, the acne group contained higher levels of virulence-associated genes, including those relating to the production and transport of pro-inflammatory compounds such as bacterial toxins that are potentially harmful to the skin. Based on the profiles of these genomic elements, the team was able to predict the health status of the individuals with high accuracy.

“This study suggests that the make-up of the bacteria in the follicles can reflect, as well as influence, the skin condition in acne or healthy skin," Dr Li said of the research.

The researchers presented their findings at the Microbiology Society’s Annual Conference held from Monday 3 April to Thursday 6 April.

“Understanding the bacterial community on the skin is important for the development of personalized treatments in acne. Instead of killing all bacteria, including the beneficial ones, we should focus on shifting the balance toward a healthy microbiota by targeting harmful bacteria or enriching beneficial bacteria,” said Dr Emma Barnard, a researcher in the Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

Source: Nutrition Horizon



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